Basic Finger Picking Exercise #1

Work On Your Basic Finger Picking With This Guitar Exercise!

Basic Finger Picking ExerciseIn this guitar lesson you will be putting a simple finger picking pattern with some basic chords. The chords that you will be using are A, D, E and F# minor. If you don’t know these chords yet you should take some time to look at the chord diagrams that we have given you. Once you have all of the basic chord shapes down you can use the basic finger picking pattern that you will be learning to play through the progression presented to you in this lesson. We have given you the TAB and sheet music so that you can see exactly what is happening. Remember, when you see a T I M or A on the sheet music those letters represent your thumb index middle and ring fingers on your picking hand.

The finger picking pattern that you will be using in this progression is pretty simple. You will start with your thumb and follow with your index, middle and ring fingers. The bass note that you will be playing with your thumb changes from chord to chord but it will always be the root of whatever chord you are playing. Your index, middle and ring fingers will always be playing either the 4th, 3rd and 2nd strings or 3rd, 2nd and 1st strings depending on which chord you are playing.

The progression that you will be playing through is A D E F# minor D E A. You should play through the finger picking pattern twice for each chord. Every time you see a particular chord you will be playing the same strings for that chord. For example, every time you see an A chord you will play the 5th string with your thumb and the 4th, 3rd and 2nd strings with your index, middle and ring fingers. Try that right now. Make an A chord and play the 5th string with your thumb followed by the 4th string with your index finger, 3rd string with your middle finger and 2nd string with your ring finger. Play this over and over again until you get a nice smooth rolling action going with your thumb and fingers on your picking hand.

The finger picking patter for the other chords in the progression is the same but the strings that you will be picking change a bit from chord to chord. When you move to the D chord you will be playing the 4th string with your thumb and the 3rd, 2nd and 1st strings with your index, middle and ring fingers. Every time you see an E chord you should play the 6th string with your thumb and the 3rd, 2nd and 1st string with your index, middle and ring fingers and every time you see an F# minor chord you should play the 6th string with your thumb and the 4th, 3rd, and 2nd strings with your index, middle and ring fingers.

It may take you a while to hit the correct strings with you thumb and fingers when changing from chord to chord, but if you practice consistently you will see you’re your thumb and fingers will start to remember which strings to play and where those strings are.

 

This Lesson Has 16 Comments

  • Eddie says:

    The two finger picking lessons are very good but do not seem to be supported with the normal tab, documentry support! An
    oversight?

  • Felicitas P. Calicdan says:

    In this guitar lesson you will be putting a simple finger picking pattern with some basic chords. The chords that you will be using are A, D, E and F# minor. If you don’t know these chords yet you should take some time to look at the chord diagrams that we have given you. Once you have all of the basic chord shapes down you can use the basic finger picking pattern that you will be learning to play through the progression presented to you in this lesson. We have given you the TAB and sheet music so that you can see exactly what is happening. Remember, when you see a T I M or A on the sheet music those letters represent your thumb index middle and ring fingers on your picking hand.

    The finger picking pattern that you will be using in this progression is pretty simple. You will start with your thumb and follow with your index, middle and ring fingers. The bass note that you will be playing with your thumb changes from chord to chord but it will always be the root of whatever chord you are playing. Your index, middle and ring fingers will always be playing either the 4th, 3rd and 2nd strings or 3rd, 2nd and 1st strings depending on which chord you are playing.

    The progression that you will be playing through is A D E F# minor D E A. You should play through the finger picking pattern twice for each chord. Every time you see a particular chord you will be playing the same strings for that chord. For example, every time you see an A chord you will play the 5th string with your thumb and the 4th, 3rd and 2nd strings with your index, middle and ring fingers. Try that right now. Make an A chord and play the 5th string with your thumb followed by the 4th string with your index finger, 3rd string with your middle finger and 2nd string with your ring finger. Play this over and over again until you get a nice smooth rolling action going with your thumb and fingers on your picking hand.

    The finger picking patter for the other chords in the progression is the same but the strings that you will be picking change a bit from chord to chord. When you move to the D chord you will be playing the 4th string with your thumb and the 3rd, 2nd and 1st strings with your index, middle and ring fingers. Every time you see an E chord you should play the 6th string with your thumb and the 3rd, 2nd and 1st string with your index, middle and ring fingers and every time you see an F# minor chord you should play the 6th string with your thumb and the 4th, 3rd, and 2nd strings with your index, middle and ring fingers.

    It may take you a while to hit the correct strings with you thumb and fingers when changing from chord to chord, but if you practice consistently you will see you’re your thumb and fingers will start to remember which strings to play and where those strings are.

    This Lesson Has

  • arska vaan says:

    just realized this is like “have you ever seen the rain” :b

  • [...] Basic Finger Picking Exercise #1Work on your finger picking with this basic finger picking guitar exercise. Learning how to properly finger pick will add diversity and depth to your everyday guitar … [...]

  • Annika says:

    I am loving learning this! I’m just having a hard time with the Fsharp minor due to the barr chord, and although I have gone through the bar chord lesson and am excersising my index finger to get stronger, I am always having the same problem with either the G or the B string turning completely silent. I try keeping real close or even on top of the fret, I try a straight slanted finger folding my finger slightly to use the bone a little, but nothing is really working. Is it just the practice? Am I just not pressing down hard enough? I have long fingers and a long thumb, if I use my thumb and index finger, that works, but I presume that would be a bad habbit to start with… Thank you so much for all these wonderful lessons!
    Annika

    • Johnny says:

      I’m having troubles too, it’d be great to see a how to play barre chords tutorial, to give an idea what kind of shape and pressure we should be using with our index finger.

    • Kim says:

      I’m having the same trouble. I found a tutorial on YouTube that was pretty helpful. Basically, they say to use your middle finger to hold down your pointer finger across the first fret. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Xhj4vichbxU

    • Eric says:

      Barr chords take time. It’s frustrating, yes. Just keep at it, you’ll get there I promise.
      I’m a slow learner on guitar, but with a LOT of practice I can do barr chords on my acoustic now.
      In the mean time, there are ways to “cheat” if you have to, using the thumb on the bass string on some chords works.

  • naresh(from india) says:

    just wonderful love ur lessons and your free service to teach guitar once again thank you

  • Vaibhav says:

    Lovely lesson. I am a newbie in learning guitar. Just want you to post a video on what position the fingers should be. That is the right hand fingers and how one should pluck the fingers, i mean with nails or normal plucking. Please help me by posting a video. I’ve searching throughout the web but not satisfied with the available videos.

  • chandru says:

    It is a beautiful lesson and simply understandable! I am going to have fun with this exercise

  • Mark says:

    I’ve noticed with a lot of players, they will let the thumb overlap the top of the bar finger to help force and hold the bar finger in place. Only works well if you are blessed with a long thumb. Also try rotating the wrist more in line with the guitar neck.

  • Caye Norwick says:

    Something seems wrong about the e chord. If i follow the directions, the 4th & 5th strings don’t even get plucked so why even bother ‘fretting’ them? Why not just fret the 3rd as that looks like that is the only one that is going to get played in this exercise. Maybe I’m not be understanding the direction?

  • furla says:

    Immediately after study several of the weblog posts on your website now, and I really like your way of blogging.

  • andre andries says:

    i just started to play guitar about 5months ago G,E,C,AM,D,EM,A,AND B are chords i can play i want to learn how to finger pick my friend are laughing at me when they see me play cause they are realy good and dont what to help me PLEASE HELP

 
 

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